Drinking Rosé in December

Drinking Rosé in December

Oh, the holidays. Christmas Eve is tomorrow and I have in fact started in on a bottle of rosé. Sitting next to the Christmas tree with the fire ablaze, Seahawks game on mute with Micheal Bublé playing in the background while I am drinking pink. It’s dumping rain outside, welcome to winter in Washington. It may seem confusing, as the normal narrative is to drink rosé in the summer. But the heart wants what it wants! If you want rosé the night before Christmas eve, why not! I am here to give you my two rosé’s to drink THIS WINTER. A bold and chatty red wine will be your main course for the season, but at 4:00pm on Christmas Eve Eve, a rosé sounds quite nice! Wherever you are, put on your snow boots or flip flops depending on the current weather and grab a bottle of rosé for your next holiday party.

Go-To Winter Rosé:

Côte des Roses 2017, Gérard Bertrand

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Source: White Horse Wine and Spirits

The best of the best! This is my favorite rosé. With a bottle with breathtaking detail, affordable price tag and enjoyable dry taste, it’s a must have. It’s fresh, light and upholds flavors of peach, lemon and honeysuckle. Some may call it collecting trash, or “hoarding” but I do save (and clean) the bottles. The beautiful rose detail on the bottom of the bottle does not belong in the trash can. I’ve wanted to make candles out of it for years, but yet no candle in sight and ten empty bottles in my closet. A thing of beauty, a drink of grace, a delicious drink for the holiday season. Pair it with peppermint bark or a red velvet cupcake and you’ve got a great pre-holiday party snack.

How’s it made? Well I thought you would never ask!

Cote des Roses is made in the Languedoc region of France. Famously known for the Pont de Gard. A famous roman aqueduct used to bring water to the French city of Nîmes. Still standing to this day and now a famous tourist destination. The famous grape varietals found in this region include but are not limited to; Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. This work of art from the winery and estate of Gérard Bertrand, as per the website, is grown in a semi-Mediterranean climate. The red varieties used in this rosé are Grenache, Cinsault and Syrah. Rosé is typically made from red grape varieties that have minimal skin contact before fermentation. Stay tuned for a post entirely on rosé!

Where to buy: Costco!! Buy in bulk and save. World Market. Easy to buy around the country and also available online.

 

The Vincent Rosé 2017, Board Track Racer, Mark Ryan Winery

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Just perfect. A rosé Evel Knievel might even enjoy. My favorite tasting room in the Pacific Northwest. This will be a more difficult wine to acquire if you are not on the West Coast of the United States. But keep yours eyes out. Mark Ryan is changing the Washington Wine World and creating a comfortable and enjoyable wine drinking experience that you could see the Wild Hogs enjoying quite nicely. This Mark Ryan rosé, The Vincent, is a crisp, balanced and tart wine. While perfect for the summer time, it’s a bright and colorful rosé for the winter as well. I would love the take the label and make a t-shirt out of it. It’s a rad rosé and would be great with a garlic and lemon based pasta dish or cheese board. For the holiday season, pair this wine with a holiday meringue or cranberry sauce dish to bring out the berry flavors.

How’s it made?

This Mark Ryan wine is of the Columbia Valley Appellation. In the Southeast of the state of Washington, this is an ever growing wine region. The Columbia Valley grape varietals grown at the highest planting percentage are Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Riesling and Chardonnay. Being the largest winemaking region of Washington, it’s fairly popular to have wineries within the valley and also tasting rooms within the Greater Seattle Area. The Mark Ryan tasting room that I could rave about until the end of time, is in Woodinville, WA. A thirty minute drive outside of downtown Seattle.

washington-wine-country-map-excerpt
Source: Sacred Drop

The grape varietals used in The Vincent rosé are Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache. Again, all red grape varieties grown in the Columbia Valley. A delicious and festive drink for the holiday season (and every other season!).

Where to buy: While I just spent the last few paragraphs convincing you to buy this wine, it may not be available anymore. The best bet is to stop by the tasting room to inquire about a new vintage! Some online websites have this wine available as well. Worth the wait and a great introduction to Washington pink wines.

Happy holidays to all! Leave Santa a glass of YOUR favorite rosé to switch it up for him this year. What’s your favorite rosé?

 

 

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