Understanding a Champagne Diet

Understanding a Champagne Diet

It is assumed that I mean a Champagne diet PAIRED with food, good food. This is not the next keto, whole 30, paleo diet, the title is definitely a joke. Just in case that needed to be explained?

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The Champagne diet is the glitz and glam of the wine world. I am going to help you understand what Champagne is, where it is made, a little history lesson, and some buying tips. I hope I am not the only person who instantly remembers Jay Gatsby holding up his, obviously vintage crystal, glass of champagne at his unbelievably incredible estate full of the 20’s elite. The Lana Del Rey montage throughout the entire Great Gatsby (2013) adaptation still gives me goosebumps. WHO KNEW we all needed to hear an entire film score of Young and Beautiful. Lana embodied the relentless hope and passion that Jay felt towards Daisy. A film we will be adding to Wine & Watch, let’s say with a bottle of Veuve? Yes, please.

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Source: IndieWire

Let’s set the scene. According to Le Comité Champagne, it was 496 AD in Champagne. In Northern region of France, Champagne was producing wines with the utmost elegance and prestige. The bubbles crafted from the Champagne region were from vineyards controlled and owned mostly by the monasteries of the area and following it’s creation, Champagne exploded like fireworks within the circles of French royalty. As wine is for the gods and goddesses, Champagne is the beverage of kings and queens. 

“It became the practice to offer Champagne wines to any royal visitors to the region. Francis I, King of France, and Mary Queen of Scots both left Reims with several casks of the local wines. Louis XIV, was apparently presented with hundreds of pints of wine on the occasion of his coronation in Reims.” – From Vine to Wine, Comité Champagne 

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Source: WriteOpinions

The Appellation of Champagne permits the growth of only the Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier grape varietals. The terroir of the region is where the beauty comes from.

ter·roir

/terˈwär/

noun

the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.

The terroir of the region is the sole contributor to the complexity and unique sensory that the Champagne winemaking process brings to life. The soil, climate and geography of each vineyard play their part in the Gatsby-esque production of these special bubbles. The winemaking process of Champagne is a natural primary fermentation, meaning there is no yeast added (in the beginning) to initiate primary fermentation. The yeast that is a resident to the grapes and the sugar filled grapes will produce the alcohol in the finished wine.

Le Méthode Champenoise or Traditionelle, is a process of a multi-fermentation process involving a secondary fermentation after bottling to create that results in carbon dioxide and “bubbles.” This secondary fermentation is encouraged using the addition of a tirage, sugar and yeast, to newly bottled wine.

The only wine that can be labeled Champagne, must be grown and produced in the Champagne region of France. All other wines with bubbles are region specific and can typically referred to as Sparkling wines. Italy’s sparkling wine is Prosecco. Spain’s sparkling wine is Cava. More posts to come about those!

If you want to learn more about Champagne, Le Comité Champagne is a spectacular resource, in English, to learn all your heart desires about this wonderful wine!

Now. Let’s talk shelf selection.

You are looking to buy a Champagne to “celebrate” or maybe it’s just a Sunday? Buying sparkling wine, or Cook’s “California Champagne,” can suffice if you are hoping to make your own bottomless mimosas. But I do recommend indulging in a classique French Champagne, personally I love Veuve Clicquot. It’s a median budget, decadent and wonderful choice. Also – follow their instagram, they have great branding. Maybe even taste Cooks and Veuve side by side? There is NO judgement for buying a bottle of wine, on my blog at least, but what I do recommend is understanding and appreciating the difference. NOW, go and pop some champagne. I hope it makes you feel young & beautiful. 

What is your favorite Champagne? Any recommendations? Cheers!